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Million Euro Winner on Slots.Cafe

June 23rd, 2016 No comments

Slots Café and White Hat Gaming are pleased to announce an epic win on the NetEnt progressive jackpot network.

On Thursday 16th June 2016, Dennis from Warwickshire, a Slots Café (www.slots.cafe) player, hit the Arabian Nights jackpot, winning €1,021,289.86 after only registering his account a few hours earlier and depositing just £35!

slots-cafe“Wow! I can’t believe it’s true!” said Dennis, father of a 1 year old daughter. With another child on the way in the next few months “All I can say is a huge thank you…If you were here right now I would kiss you…I am just happy for my children more than anything!” . Whilst still getting over the shock of winning Dennis is already thinking about a secure future for his family and starting his own business.

About Slots Café

Play Slots.Cafe and have your fun dished up to you in bite sized chunks in our exciting new online casino world. Slots.Cafe is a new and exciting world of slots games, casino games (including all your favorites such as blackjack and roulette), video poker and of course loads of industry leading slots from game providers such as NetEnt. Powered by White Hat Gaming and regulated by the UK Gambling Commission and operated in an honest, fair and transparent way, Slots.Cafe is your destination for fun and financial rewards. Play online at Slots.Cafe and enjoy access to quality games and many more progressive jackpots such as the Million Euro prize won by Dennis.

Categories: Arthur, Gambling Tags:

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery

October 1st, 2014 Comments off

Some two and a half years ago I was, to be honest, nervous when Bwin-Party announced that their then newly acquired social subsidiary Win would be releasing a social sports betting product.  Social sports betting was, after all, the main game of 2BET2 – my sports apps business.

2bet2 for serious sportstersRoll on a few years and (more than a year later than predicted) they roll out sportster on Facebook.  Now – let’s gloss over the first obvious fact – that they purloined our tagline for their name.  We used the word Sportster from day one. Now I know its just an english word, but really – could they not have been more original?

The product is OK.  Its a flash based game and covers football.  That’s football in the European sense of the word – don’t go here expecting any sports from the American side of the pond – they don’t exist.  So be it.  Bet types are fairly simple although perhaps they get better as you progress through the game.  So far – nothing game changing.

2BET2 sports selection2BET2 Sports Selection

 

 

 

 

Compare European football with the selection of coverage from 2BET2 and you get an idea of what you are missing on Bwin’s effort.


When Bwin partnered with Nordeus I was anticipating something more in line with Nordeus’s market leading fantasy sports products but it seems this was not to be.  Honestly I think that was a mistake on their part – there has to be space in the market for a more fantasy/betting blended game.

2BET2 Turbo Bet

 

 

 

Another feature which they copied invented? was the addition of virtual sports based on real world events and odds with a “proprietary result prediction engine”.  Quite frankly an exact copy of the 2BET2 Turbo Bet option.  Yes – we take real world events and odds, schedule the events for the next few minutes, and randomise the results.

Really the only difference between the Bwin/Sportster version of virtual events and 2BET2 Turbo Bet is the name, and the broader selection of sports available on 2BET2.


I wish BWin-Party all the best with their product.  They presumably have budget to promote it and no doubt will get some traction.  God knows they need it to work – their core gambling games have been declining over the past few years.

Meanwhile we here at 2BET2 headquarters are working on the next iteration of 2BET2.  Expect something different.  Something game changing.  Something that BWin Party will take longer than 2 years to copy.  We are currently in the early development and fund raise stage for the new initiative – it’s going to be huge and that takes money – but it promises to be sensational!

Until then – adios!

2BET2 Sports Apps

2BET2 Sports Apps – the future of social sports

2BET2 sports selection

Categories: Arthur, Computers, Gambling Tags:

Musings on Bitcoin vs iCoins

March 7th, 2014 Comments off

I have been interested in the movement of money for most of my professional life, and initiated a number of businesses to ease payments in the digital world from Earthport – LSE:EPO (CTO/Founder) through to iCoins more recently.  The quest is always the same – how to move money between interested parties – whether from individual to individual or from customer to merchant – quickly, seamlessly and robustly.  By the latter I mean that transactions must settle and risk to all parties should be minimised.

This against a background of credit cards being “ruling the roost” with all their inherent flaws, unsuitability for online transactions and high propensity for fraud.  Clearly there has to be a better way.

The currency of the internetiCoins took the approach that the interfaces to the physical world could be independent of one another, and that stored value should always be underpinned by value in the same currency in any one of many treasuries (financial institutions). To a large degree this mimics the real world.  We further saw that transactions should/could be anonymous at the time of transacting, but that sufficient audit trail should be provided to satisfy authorities concerns over money laundering and the use of the system to perpetuate crime.

The system was well engineered.  It mimiced to a large degree the real world in that it left the responsibility for looking after value and dealing with end users in the hands of the existing players, but it extended the field to include not just financial institutions, but any party who acts as a source or destination for customer funds. So it was possible to send funds instantly from (say) your Skrill wallet to (say) your wallet on Neteller. Or from Pokerstars directly to Ladbrokes to facilitate that urgent bet. Contractual arrangements were put in place between all parties in a way that could evolve and grow without the system becoming unmanaged. In a way this “feature” was an achilles heel as well.

Unfortunately we ran out of funds to commercialise iCoins.  So while the systems are all completed and were deployed in a number of scenarios, the company has had to be mothballed.

BitcoinThen along came Bitcoin.  On the face of it it offers all that iCoins offers.  But it seems tidier.  End points can hook on without any contractual obligations and “money” just flows. Money is worth what it trades for – a tidy model and with the inherently limited supply of BTC a very stable model in the long term, albeit with massive volatility in the short term.  Money is stored in client side wallets – in other words wallets that are on your device be it a computer, phone or whatever.  Client side wallets in my view provide a double edged sword – while they are more secure against theft (ala Mt Gox) they are also susceptible to failure – hardware/software failure or simply lost private keys.  So with the client side wallet the currency is inherently deflationary in that coins can be lost.

Some of its features also lead to concerns.  While there is a transaction trail (good thing), there is no standard or legal identification of end points along the trail, making it tricky to satisfy regulatory AML concerns.  And the latter is a bigger problem in that there is no control over the probity of the end points, or contractual relationships with end points. Now, with the failure of Mt Gox, we see what can happen in this scenario. In many respects they behaved as an unregulated poorly managed wild west bank – placing few controls on treasury funds and allowing the bandits to make off with the money.  Arguably they would not have reached the level of insolvency that they did had they been properly regulated (although recent events in the banking world question this assessment). In any case we now see the result – the largest “bank” in the Bitcoin world is no more and gone with it are the customer funds.

Having said all that – this is no dissimilar to the US monetary system in the 19th century.  There were bank failures, insolvency and theft there too. There was volatility. The list goes on.

So – in the end – where are we?  BTC has gone through a test  phase now – has seen a significant acceptance, and is now going through the failure of an end-point.  Unfortunately that was the largest end-point which doesn’t help!  End result – end-points will be regulated entities such as wallets and the like and eventually perhaps banks.

Is iCoins a better model?  In a lot of ways yes, in that it complies with AML and provides the exact same feature that everyone likes about BTC without the drawbacks.  It provides anonymous but traceable, instant, simple, secure cross wallet/treasury/currency transactions without trying to be a currency in its own right with all the downsides of volatility and market acceptance.  iCoins can be based on any currency with an exchange rate, so we could have independent coins, indeed we could integrate BTC, but we also offer all the advantages of BTC without forcing a new currency on the world.

Too bad we ran out of steam.  Perhaps it’s time for a rethink!

Categories: Arthur, Computers, Gambling Tags:

Prof Nelson Rose on Gambling in the USA

May 16th, 2012 No comments

How We Got Here & Where We’re Going

            The United States is about to join Canada and the rest of the world on the greatest expansion of legal gambling since New Hampshire rediscovered the state lottery.  But this time, it is going to be online.

We are in the middle of what I call the Third Wave of legal gambling.  This is the third time that legal gaming has swept across both Canada and the U.S.

The First Wave started before either country existed.  Lotteries in England helped finance the first settlements.  In the colonies, government-approved and private lotteries were actively encouraged.  But great scandals–mostly privately run lotteries where the operators absconded with the loot–led to lotteries being banned by most state and provincial constitutions.

The Second Wave began with the opening of the Western frontier, where gambling was tolerated, and often expressly authorized.  The Civil War devastated the South, and legal gambling is seen as a painless tax.  But by the 1890s scandals and a reawakened morality once again led to a crackdown.  The Louisiana Lottery, “The Serpent,” led to the first strong U.S. federal anti-lottery laws.  By the turn of the 20th century, all state lotteries had been shut down.  Casinos and racetracks soon followed.  Even Nevada outlawed casino gambling in 1909.

The Third Wave started with the Depression.  In 1931 Nevada re-legalized casinos.  Every year since, there has been an expansion of legal gambling.  Racetracks reopened in the 1930s; low-stakes charity bingo spread in the ‘40s; social games in the ‘50s.  Then, in 1963, New Hampshire Legislature authorized the first state lottery of the century, labeled a “Sweepstakes” and tied to horseraces to avoid 70 year-old federal anti-lottery statutes.

U.S. federal laws are designed to help the states enforce their public policies toward gambling.  The federal anti-lottery laws were enacted in the 1890s to help states like New York keep out The Serpent.  But the prohibitions were so great, states had to ask for exemptions once they started running their own state lotteries.

In 1961, Congress enacted the Wire Act, designed to cut “The Wire,” the telegraph that illegal bookies used to get the results of horseraces before their patrons.  Betting on horseraces is obviously legal in many states, so, like the federal anti-lottery statutes, the Wire Act applied to state-legal gambling that crossed state lines.

As with state lotteries, when states started authorizing remote wagering on horseraces, the federal laws had to be changed.  Congress first enacted an Interstate Horseracing Act.  In December 2000, it amended that Act to expressly allow states to decide for themselves whether they would let their residents bet on races by phone and computer.

There is only one other federal statute that could apply to state-legal gambling.  When the State Lotteries of Delaware and Oregon began taking bets on National Football League games, Congress passed the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (“PASPA”), preventing new state-authorized sports betting.

The history of the Unlawful Internet Gambling Enforcement Act (“UIGEA”) is well known:  A failing politician, Bill Frist (R.-TN), used his position as Majority Leader of the U.S. Senate to ram through a bill that he hoped would boost his chances to become President.  This was in October 2006.

The largest publicly traded company taking online bets from the U.S., PartyGaming, home of Party Poker, believed the UIGEA made their activities illegal.  The announcement that it was cutting off its major customer base resulted in a 60% drop in the price of the company’s stock.  Other publicly traded online gaming operators were hit as hard:  The UIGEA was like a terrorist attack, instantly wiping out more than $7 billion on the London Stock Exchange.

The UIGEA did not actually change any substantive state or federal anti-gambling laws.  It did create a new federal crime, but only for operators who were already violating American anti-gambling laws.  And it called for new regulations on payment processors.

Those regulations actually turned out to be quite useful for legal businesses, such as skill games, fantasy sports, free alternative means of entry poker and pure intra-state gaming.  The last turned out to be the most important.

The federal Department of Justice (“DoJ”) has been waging a war of intimidation against all Internet gambling, but especially Internet poker.  But the DoJ is missing the two essentials for a successful prosecution: a statute that clearly makes the activity illegal and a defendant who can be brought to trial in the U.S.

For a statute, the DoJ has been relying upon the Wire Act.  Using a law designed for telegraph wires on horseraces against Internet poker is like using stone tools to perform brain surgery:  It might work, but it is awfully messy.

The DoJ took the position that the Wire Act covered all forms of gambling, even state-legal gaming, so long as a wire crosses even temporarily into another state.  But courts, including a federal Court of Appeal hearing consolidated class actions brought by losing players against MasterCard, ruled that the Wire Act applies only to sports events.  And now a new federal statute, the UIGEA, expressly stated that intra-state online gambling is legal under that statute, even if wires cross temporarily into other states.

After the MasterCard decision, Nevada and the American Virgin Islands passed legislation to allow Internet casinos.  Nevada regulators went so far as to begin holding hearings.  But the DoJ wrote them letters, threatening to arrest any licensee who took a bet online.

At least six states began taking orders for subscription tickets for their state lotteries online.  Illinois and New York asked the DoJ whether they could use out of state payment processors.  The UIGEA would allow that, since the customer and operator were in the same state.  But the DoJ’s interpretation of the Wire Act would not.

In early 2011, state-legal Internet gambling looked like it was going to explode, despite the DoJ and the Wire Act.  Caesars Entertainment received permission from Nevada gaming regulators to team up with 888, which had taken poker bets from the U.S.  The District of Columbia legalized Internet poker and other games.  So, Harry Reid (D.-NV), the majority leader of the U.S. Senate, and Jon Kyl (R.-AZ) the minority whip, wrote the DoJ, asking it to reaffirm its position that the Wire Act made everything illegal.

Two days before Christmas, the DoJ issued a formal announcement that it was reversing its position on the Wire Act.  To reconcile the apparent conflict with the UIGEA, prosecutors would from now on limit the Wire Act to sports bets.  It therefore would not be a problem for state lotteries to use out-of-state payment processors.

The DoJ had to also know that this reversal meant Reid and Kyl got their answer: There is no federal law preventing any state from authorizing almost any form of intra-state gambling.  PASPA still prevents new sports betting, but that is being challenged in the courts by New Jersey.

The gambling must be legal under state law.  On April 15, 2011, the DoJ announced the indictment of the principals of the five largest poker sites then taking real money bets from America.  But the Wire Act was never mentioned.  Instead, the UIGEA and federal organized crime charges were based on violations of New York state anti-gambling laws.

Once a state decides to legalize Internet gambling, there is almost no limit to what it can do.  Small states should be able to compact together to create player pools in the millions.  Even without a compact, a state could authorize its licensees to accept bets from foreign nations where the betting is legal, such as England.

In March, the Illinois Lottery starting selling individual tickets online: more than $1.14 million the first week.  Every lottery is now looking to see whether it can join the three Canadian Lotteries that are already operating Internet poker games.  More than half the states allow at-home betting on races.  Nevada has two online sports operators, one accepting credit cards, and will start issuing its first Internet poker licenses this summer.  Landbased operators are paying outrageous amounts for Internet expertise, while social game companies, like Zynga, are openly saying they want to join.

The question is no longer whether Internet gambling will be made legal, or even when.  The question is who is going to ride the Third Wave.

 

© 2012, I. Nelson Rose.  Prof. Rose is recognized as one of the world’s leading experts on gambling law, and is a consultant and expert witness for governments and industry.  His latest books, Internet Gaming Law (1st and 2nd editions), Blackjack and the Law and Gaming Law: Cases and Materials, are available through his website, www.GamblingAndTheLaw.com.

 

iGaming Super Show in Prague

June 3rd, 2010 No comments

Had the good fortune to attend the iGaming super show in Prague last week.  Fortune because it was a really good time, I got to see all my good friends again, and also managed to get the word out about our new affiliate system for Mahjong Club.

We launched the new Super Affs affiliate system for Mahjong Club just in time for the show.  Packed with heavyweight reporting, great demographic info and some really cool features like intelligent ad rotation, the system is powered by egass.  In the future we expect to add further brands to the same affiliate system – creating a one stop shop for those affiliates who want something more from their products.

Meeting David Coulthard at the iGaming Super Show

Meeting David Coulthard at the iGaming Super Show

While at the show I met David Coulthard who was the keynote speaker on day 1.  David is well known to any Formula 1 fan, having driven for many years and still acting as an advisor to Red Bull formula one team and a BBC commentator.  He was at the show representing Jet Bull.  He assures there is no relationship between Jet Bull (a gaming product) and Red Bull – despite the abundance of Red Bull drinks at their stand and party and of course his presence at the show!

Outside "U-Fleku" with Dennis

Outside "U-Fleku" with Dennis

Jeanine joined me for the weekend and we saw a lot of beautiful Prague.  It truly is an amazing city and one that is well worth a visit.  I hope we return there next year.

Charles Bridge in Prague

Charles Bridge in Prague

SEO Oktoberfest 2009

October 5th, 2009 No comments

Too funny!  Take a bunch of the world’s best SEO  (Search Engine Optimisation) guys, put them in Munich at the time of the Oktoberfest, throw way too much money at the party and this is what you get!

SEOktoberfest 2009 – The Movie from Mike Rübesam on Vimeo.

Categories: Arthur, Computers, Gambling Tags: ,

Gamblesurf – gambler’s reference and news

May 14th, 2009 No comments

Just a short note about another site by yours truly – Gamblesurf – that offers news, gossip and recomendations on the online gambling world.  Please pop by and visit at your convenience!

http://www.gamblesurf.com

Categories: Gambling Tags: , , , ,